Suntoy promises to give our planet a brighter future by making every hour a solar-power-hour.

Rhino Solar Collars

By |2020-03-12T07:13:18+00:00January 14th, 2020|

Southern Africa’s rhino are in grave peril. The total number of rhino poached and killed in South Africa in 2012 was 618, up from 448 in 2011. At this alarming rate, by 2025 there will be no rhino left on earth. Crime syndicates are fearless. The rhino horns are ground into powder for traditional medicines in East Asia. Experts say this powder actually has no medicinal purpose though that has not stopped the demand. Rhino horns are made of keratin, the same substance that comprises human hair and fingernails. $65,000 a kilo…!

Suntoy is collaborating with specialist anti-poaching units and field ranger patrols. Rhino Solar Tracking Collars are in development. GPS tracking collars monitor position, speed and behavior over preset intervals. When battery power on these devises is depleted, the radio antennae stop sending information on the location of the rhino and poachers pounce. Charging these GPS tracking devices from solar energy prevents loss of battery power. Malleable solar panels have been sewn into leather collars. Prototypes are currently being tested on one rhino and two cows.

 

The Big Five

By |2020-03-26T08:04:25+00:00January 14th, 2020|

A visit to South Africa’s game reserves is incomplete without spotting the Big Five – lion, leopard, elephant, buffalo and rhinoceros. Yet, with a surge in rhino poaching leading to possible extinction, South Africa could be left with just the Big Four. That’s not a sunny outcome.

Intent on protecting the rhino, we learnt of an initiative to fundraise for RhinoSA – lead by a group of savvy 12 year olds. Suntoy donated 50 Consol Solar Jars to these scholars and they sold them at their school. They made a donation to RhinoSA at their Enviro Assembly in front of the National Geographic film crew. There is a huge demand for the Consol Solar Jar at their school now, so Suntoy is donating more jars to these budding fundraisers.

Their teacher, Mr Hansen, emailed us: “I would like to thank the children for their participation and congratulate them on their contribution to save the South African rhino. I applaud their innovative thinking and practical approach. I would also like to express my gratitude to their parents, who have awakened in them a sense of responsibility for their environment and the animals and people in it.”

Well done Gaby, Chanel, Alex, Nina, Kirsten, Courtney, Klara and Katrina! Suntoy looks forward to you selling more solar lights to save the rhino. What would South Africa be with only the Big Four? Let’s make sure it stays the Big Five!

Giving the Gift of Light

By |2020-03-26T09:23:51+00:00January 13th, 2020|

Giving the gift of light in honour of Nelson Mandela was worthy of every second in 67 minutes.

Informal urban settlements spring up off-grid across cities in South Africa. Without electrification, these city dwellers rely on hazardous fire-inducing household appliances. Shack fires result in smoke inhalation, severe burns and loss of life and property.

To commemorate Mandela Day, Suntoy donated Consol Solar Jars to children and their care givers at Children of Fire, a place of healing. By manufacturing a safe, clean and rechargeable solar powered light, Suntoy aims to eradicate the causes of these horrendous burns and the long-term trauma that follows.

No candles, no matches, no fire, no dangerous and polluting kerosene or paraffin. Solar lights equal healthier environments. Burn free.

“It is time for new hands to lift the burdens. It is in your hands now.” – Nelson Mandela
At Suntoy, we acknowledge that we have solar power in our hands to make a valuable difference in our community.

Namibian School Pupils

By |2020-03-26T09:29:19+00:00January 13th, 2020|

The Young Achievers Empowerment Project, a Namibian youth organisation, has launched a project entitled Promoting Renewable Energy in Informal Settlements which aims to encourage the use of solar lights by youth that live off-grid in Namibia.

With a small commencement grant, they chose the Consol Solar Jar as their preferred choice of solar light. “Many young people do not have electricity at home and it is not safe to use candles at night because of shack fires. We hope to help less privileged children who cannot study at night because of lack of electricity,” said Johannes Mulunga.

The pilot phase reached approximately 80 school pupils between Grades one and seven from informal settlements in Khomas, Oshana, Oshikoto, Erongo and Kavango. Phase two of the project invites the general public to purchase a Consol Solar Jar for N$160 (Namibian currency), which will be gifted to a school pupil.

“We call on the public to help those in need to prosper in their schoolwork. Buying this solar light for a child will allow them to be as competitive as a child from an advantaged family,” said Johannes. “Our project is going so well and the response has been overwhelming. An article about our story even appeared in the local Namibian newspaper,” emailed Michael Mulunga.

Interested parties who wish to purchase a Consol Solar Jar for this worthy cause can contact Johannes Mulunga at 081 385 3749 or Israel Ndilipunje at 081 436 0497.

Making a Difference

By |2020-03-26T09:38:15+00:00January 13th, 2020|

Here’s a dose of good news – positive, uplifting and inspirational. This story offers hope.

The Making a Difference (MAD) awards ceremony celebrated a year of commitment to crime prevention in our province, Gauteng. The audience of domestic workers, dressed in beautiful traditional outfits, filled the Rosebank Union Church with a vibrant energy. Each one of them is committed to being a shining light in their communities. They refuse to wallow in the disillusionment of our crime statistics, choosing rather to fight wrongdoing in South Africa, one small gesture at a time.

The police thanked them for being valuable contributors. “No success is a small success. Every success is a big one. There are so many good news stories worthy of a wow,” said Penny Steyn, MAD Domestic Watch and SAPS Customer Service Trainer.

Suntoy and Consol donated Consol Solar Jars that were gifted to lucky-draw recipients. Harald was invited to give a talk and demonstrate how the Consol Solar Jar works. Our Suntoy team is proud to be associated with MAD and the good work they do. Thank you for welcoming us into your MAD family. We look forward to shining light on dark places with you.

Watch Harald talk at the MAD event:

Solar Jars and Schoolbags

By |2020-03-26T09:40:59+00:00January 13th, 2020|

Partner Products can bring innovative products to market effectively. The Solar Jar ™ is solidly established in consumers’ eyes and is well-positioned to assist in bringing a newer, less known partner product to market.

The Solar Jar ™ is now offered bundled with a partner product, the Repurpose Schoolbag. It’s a symbiotic relationship of mutual benefit. Made from upcycled plastic shopping bags, the Repurpose Schoolbag has a pocket that integrates the lid of the Solar Jar ™.

During the day, while scholars walk to school with the schoolbag strapped to their backs, the solar panel charges in the sun. At night, the lid is screwed onto the Consol glass jar and transforms into a solar-powered reading light to study by. The schoolbag gives the solar panel an alternative mode of charging instead of remaining on a window cill by day.

Suntoys priority is to supply solar lights to children living off-grid in informal settlements. Our team now has an additional outlet with Repurpose Schoolbags to increase our reach. It’s a collaboration to achieve shared goals.

Rethaka, the company that produces the schoolbags, connects with Giving Partners, such as Consol, to fund the making, distribution and coupling with Solar Jar ™.  “Reimagining how solar energy can become easily accessible to those who need it the most, is what was at the heart of the integration of the solar light with our school bags,” said Thato Kgatlhanya of Rethaka.

As partners, we were all excited when Bill Gates mentioned the solar pocketed schoolbags on Twitter.

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